Why Build Education Facilities


Why Buildings?

Why build educational facilities?

Developing nations face a number of hurdles in their journey from poverty and dependence on foreign aid through to self-reliance and economic and governmental stability. Access to education for the next generation is a major key to progress, and while figures indicate steadily rising percentages of children in primary school worldwide, it’s also clear Sub-Saharan Africa is drastically lagging behind the rest of the world.

Lack of resources has been identified as a major barrier to keeping up with the demand for education. For example, many established schools suffer from a dramatic lack of classroom space – seriously affecting their ability to teach as many kids as possible. For those children who are lucky enough to be able to enrol in, and complete, a primary level education, the chances of secondary level education then being available to them are extremely limited.

be*’s mission of providing ‘bricks and mortar’ help in the shape of classrooms and facilities means that schools can get on with the job of education, bringing long term change, knowledge and an expanded skills base to their growing nations.

16%

OF KENYAN CHILDREN OF PRIMARY SCHOOL AGE DO NOT GO TO SCHOOL*

ONLY 41%

OF PRIMARY SCHOOL STUDENTS IN TANZANIA WILL BE ABLE TO TRANSITION ON TO SECONDARY EDUCATION*

YOU’LL FIND 73

PUPILS IN AN AVERAGE CLASS IN UGANDA**

*UNESCO Global Education Digest 2011. Retrieved 25 October 2012.
**Nannyonjo, Harriet. World Bank Working Paper No. 98. “Education Inputs in Uganda: An Analysis of Factors Influencing Learning Achievement in Grade Six.” The World Bank. 2007.  Retrieved 25 October 2012.